Monday, September 29, 2008

How to re-enable the Snipping Tool

After making a few tweaks here and there to your computer, you may find that the Windows Snipping Tool had disappeared. I use it quite often for this weblog so when it disappeared, I had quite a headache. I’m sure many also want to know how to bring this tool back.

First, open your Start Menu and type in programs and features.
Then choose “Turn Windows Features on or Off” from the side Menu.

You probably least expected this, but snipping tool falls under the Tablet PC Optional Components category.
Snipping Tool Windows Vista

Check it again, press OK, and your Snipping Tool will come back.

http://www.vistarewired.com/2008/03/08/how-to-re-enable-the-snipping-tool

Friday, September 26, 2008

Write an assembly program to READ YOUR NAME AND DISPLAY IT IN NEWLINE

Write an assembly program to READ YOUR NAME AND DISPLAY IT IN NEWLINE

title read and display name

dosseg

.model small

.stack 100H

.code

main proc

                mov ax, @data ; initialize ds register

                mov ds, ax

 

                mov ah, 09h       ; display message1

                mov dx, offset msg1

                int 21h

               

                mov ah, 0ah       ; read string

                mov dx, offset string

                int 21h

               

                mov alt, 09h       ; your name is

                mov dx, offset msg2

                int 21h

 

                mov ah, 09h       ; string output

                mov dx, offset string

                int 21h

                mov ax, 4C00H ; return to DOS

                int 21H

main endp

end main

 

.data

                msg1 db "Enter your name $"

                msg2 db "OAH, ODH, your name is $"

                max db 20

                len db ?

                string db 20 DUP('$')


Please, test this program in an Assembler ie Macroassembler (MASM) or Turbo Assembler, NASM or emulators.

 

Friday, September 19, 2008

Discover iTunes8. Rediscover your Music. Download new iTunes 8

itune8

New Genius features and better ways to browse put music at the center of your entertainment world. Songs to play. Shows to watch. Movies to rent and to own. Whatever keeps you entertained, iTunes keeps it handy.

Genuis playlists

Genius playlists and sidebar.

Create a playlist of songs that go great together and get recommendations for new songs.

Learn more

HD TV

HD TV shows.

Buy your favorite shows, including Heroes and The Office, in high definition. Episodes cost just $2.99.

Learn more

New grid views

New ways to browse.

Browse your music, movies, and TV shows by cover art. Quickly skim albums by artist and genre.

Learn more

  • Music
    icon

    iTunes puts your entire digital music collection all in one place and just one click away.Learn more

  • Movies
    icon

    Browse thousands of movies to buy or rent and watch them in minutes. Learn more

  • TV Shows
    icon

    Shop the iTunes Store for your favorite TV shows, now available in HD. Learn more

  • Applications
    icon

    Browse thousands of games and applications for iPhone and iPod touch. Learn more

  • Podcasts
    icon

    Choose from over 100,000 of free audio and video shows, some in HD. Learn more

  • Audiobooks
    icon

    Buy audiobooks on the iTunes Store and catch up on your reading — just by listening.Learn more

  • iPod Games
    icon

    Get games for your Click Wheel-based iPod for on-the-go fun.Learn more

  • iTunes U
    icon

    Sit in on classes from the world’s top colleges and universities — free. Learn more

  • iTunes Gifts
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    Give music and more with Gift Cards, gift certificates, and allowances. Learn more

Thursday, September 18, 2008

The new iPod touch. Game on.

the new iPod touch.

The new, ultrathin iPod touch was born to play. Tilt, tap, shake, and swipe your way through stunning 3D games and applications designed for iPod touch. Enjoy movies and TV shows on the crisp 3.5-inch widescreen display. Use the Genius feature to create a playlist of songs that go great together. Surf the web and send email from any Wi-Fi hotspot. Learn more

Sleek new design.

With a stunningly thin, contoured stainless steel design, iPod touch feels even better in your hand. And the new volume buttons and built-in speaker give you more to love.

Get your mobile game on.

Groundbreaking technologies built into iPod touch — such as the Multi-Touch display, accelerometer, and 3D graphics — immerse you in the action.

Learn more

Music just got smarter.

The new Genius feature turns iPod touch into a highly intelligent, personal DJ. With a few taps, it creates a playlist by finding songs in your library that go great together.

Learn more

features of iPod

iPod & Apple TV
iTunes
Partner with iTunes
More iPod + iTunes
iTunes Store

Enjoy new views, Genius playlists, HD TV shows, and more.

Download iTunes 8 now

The new iPod touch. Game on.

the new iPod touch.

The new, ultrathin iPod touch was born to play. Tilt, tap, shake, and swipe your way through stunning 3D games and applications designed for iPod touch. Enjoy movies and TV shows on the crisp 3.5-inch widescreen display. Use the Genius feature to create a playlist of songs that go great together. Surf the web and send email from any Wi-Fi hotspot. Learn more

Sleek new design.

With a stunningly thin, contoured stainless steel design, iPod touch feels even better in your hand. And the new volume buttons and built-in speaker give you more to love.

Get your mobile game on.

Groundbreaking technologies built into iPod touch — such as the Multi-Touch display, accelerometer, and 3D graphics — immerse you in the action.

Learn more

Music just got smarter.

The new Genius feature turns iPod touch into a highly intelligent, personal DJ. With a few taps, it creates a playlist by finding songs in your library that go great together.

Learn more

features of iPod

iPod & Apple TV
iTunes
Partner with iTunes
More iPod + iTunes
iTunes Store

Enjoy new views, Genius playlists, HD TV shows, and more.

Download iTunes 8 now

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Panasonic Launches Camera Based on New Technology in India

The way in which light is gathered and focused in SLR cameras has not changed right from the film days to the current generation of digital models. Panasonic and Olympus were working on a more compact system called the Micro Four Thirds system, derived from the tried and tested Four Thirds system that’s been used until now.

The new camera is called Panasonic Lumix G1. Panasonic does not call this a DSLR but they refer to it as a Digital Interchangeable Lens System Camera. The naming scheme not withstanding, the Lumix G1 is a first of sorts. It has an electronic viewfinder, a first for a non point-and-shoot model. Panasonic’s move to the Micro Four Thirds system allows them to make cameras that combine the compactness of point-and-shoot cameras with the versatility of SLRs.

The camera produces 12MP images, can shoot in JPEG (two quality levels) as well as RAW. Face detection, AF tracking, 4x digital zoom and optical image stabilization, ISO 3200 are in the features list.
It will be interesting to see how the competition responds, especially Olympus who are also working on a Micro Four Thirds model. As for the biggies in the business like Canon and Nikon, it will mean a new series of lenses, while they have a vast array of lenses from the film days.

Monday, September 15, 2008

Create Your Own Blu-ray Video Discs

If you’re enough of an early adopter to have an HD camcorder as well as an HDTV and a set-top Blu-ray player, you’re probably itching to create high-def discs from your footage and present them on your HDTV.

Sure, you could just plug your camcorder into your TV and press Play, but then you would miss out on all the great HD features that Blu-ray has to offer. I’ll show you how to burn your video onto discs that will run on your Blu-ray player.

For this project, you’ll need a high-def camcorder and a Blu-ray video editing application. Surprisingly, you don’t necessarily need an actual Blu-ray recorder (which can cost upward of Rs 20,000) to do the job. You can burn regular DVD discs in a high-def format—complete with Blu-ray menus—using a standard DVD recorder, though it fits substantially less footage onto a disc.

Of course, if you’re creating an epic saga of your family’s vacation adventures, you’ll want a real Blu-ray burner such as the LG GGW-H20L, which can record more than 4 hours of 1080i video footage from your HD camcorder to a single 50GB disc.


Within your favorite Blu-ray-compatible video editing application, trim and edit your clips, mark your chapters, and customize your disc menu. For high-definition 16:9 discs, size the background art to 1280 by 720 pixels before importing it.

Burning Your Blu-ray Disc: Avoid Missteps
After you’ve finished editing and creating your disc menus, set the recording parameters and burn to disc. This is the tricky part, as it’s the only step of the process where things can go very wrong. First, be sure that all of the needed Blu-ray codecs and plug-ins are installed, and confirm that your Blu-ray drive (if you have one) is attached to your computer. Most Blu-ray software requires separate registration of Blu-ray components, which happens only when you attach a Blu-ray drive and start to author with it.

Next, make certain that your output settings are at the highest quality, and that they match your source video. For example, if your source video is HDV (.m2t), confirm that MPEG-2 1440 by 1080 is chosen as the video format. Similarly, for AVCHD (.mts), choose MPEG-4/H.264 and either 1440 by 1080 or 1920 by 1080, depending on the resolution at which you recorded the video. If you need to mix HDV and AVCHD clips, choose AVCHD and 1440 by 1080 as a common output format.

The purpose of carefully matching your output settings with your source video is to maximize quality while minimizing the need for re-encoding by your video editor—a process that can take many hours. CyberLink PowerDirector has a special “smart rendering” technology that skips encoding of any parts of your video clips that have not been modified. So if all you’ve done is trim the ends of clips, you’ll avoid most production and encoding time. By contrast, Pinnacle Studio 12 does not have equivalent capabilities, so it ended up spending more than 30 minutes saving a BDMV disc image of a tiny 3-minute AVCHD clip, even though I had not modified the video at all. Pinnacle says that smart rendering is not yet implemented in Studio Ultimate for AVCHD files, although it is for HDV.
The settings box will also ask you about your disc format and media. This is where you specify that you want to burn a BDMV, and choose Blu-ray or DVD media for your project. The burn-setup box in Pinnacle Studio has similar options, plus a setting for creating a disc-image folder on your hard drive as well as for burning a disc. This is a great feature, since you can go back and reburn that disc image, without waiting for production and encoding, at any time. You can also use the disc image as a test file, burning it only when you are satisfied that your project is perfect; this approach saves you from cranking out a stack of expensive drink coasters.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Microsoft Translator Is Live On Live Search, IE8, Windows Live Toolbar, and Windows Live Messenger

Microsoft has dumped former translation partner Systran from all its products and services and implemented instead exclusively its in-house developed Machine Translation technology. Dubbed Microsoft Translator, and built by Microsoft Research, Systran's replacement is now featured into a variety of the company's software solutions, either desktop- or Cloud-based. In this context, the Redmond giant has made a step forward from using the products offered by Systran and built on top of the open source Linux operating system, alongside its own Machine Translation project, to just Microsoft Translator.
"Now that the Web is more worldwide than ever, the number of non-native English speakers going online has ballooned, and yet online content in English still dominates. For these users, free translation services mean that an entire world of information can now actually be at their fingertips. We're doing something to help them out. Translation now fully powered by the Microsoft Translator technology is available through Live Search, as well as IE8, the Windows Live Toolbar, and even a translation bot for Windows Live Messenger," explained Lane Rau, marketing manager, Microsoft Research Machine Translation team.
The transition from third party technology to Microsoft Translator was signaled by the launch of the Windows Live Messenger translation bot at the start of September. Rau promised that Microsoft was in the process of introducing support for additional language pairs on top of what is available today through the first full implementation of Microsoft Translator.
"All translation pairs on the site (11 English-X, 12 X-English) are powered by Microsoft Research-developed systems. Two transliteration pairs (chscht), courtesy of the Windows International team. For several languages, better language quality. And finally, the release of TBot, a translation bot for Windows Live Messenger. This release is the combination of all the effort that the team has put into machine translation, not only over the past months, but literally over the past years," revealed a member of the Microsoft Research Machine Translation team.

Friday, September 05, 2008

Google Browser 'Chrome' Takes on Microsoft and Mozilla

Google is launching a beta version of its own Web browser today in more than 100 countries, the company announced yesterday in a blog posting.
The open-source browser, called Chrome, first appeared on an unofficial Google blog in the form of a comic book. "As you may have read in the blogosphere, we hit 'send' a bit early on a comic book introducing our new open source browser, Google Chrome," the company said in the official announcement that appeared late Monday afternoon after the Internet began buzzing about the comic-book site. The blog posting was by Sundar Pichai, vice president of product management, and Linus Upson, engineering director.

The browser window is "streamlined and simple," they said, describing in words what can be seen visually at the unofficial blog, Google Blogoscoped. "To most people, it isn't the browser that matters. It's only a tool to run the important stuff —the pages, sites and applications that make up the Web. Like the classic Google homepage, Google Chrome is clean and fast. It gets out of your way and gets you where you want to go," the blog posting said.

Chrome will run Web applications "much better," they wrote, with tabs kept in an isolated "sandbox," which will prevent "one tab from crashing into another and provide improved protection from rogue sites." Better speed and responsiveness are also part of Chrome, which features "a more powerful JavaScript engine, V8, to power the next generation of Web applications that aren't even possible in today's browsers."
Components from Apple's WebKit and Mozilla's Firefox are part of the open-source Chrome, they said.

Mozilla to Get Google Cash for Three More Years

Mozilla has renewed an agreement with Google that pays the browser maker for assigning Google's search engine as Firefox's default.
"This agreement now ends in November of 2011 rather than November of 2008, so we have stability in income," said Mitchell Baker, currently the chairwoman of Mozilla.

Mozilla generates the bulk of its income from ties to Google, according to the company's latest financial results. For the 2006 tax year - the most recent numbers make public by Mozilla - 85 percent, or about $57m of the company's $67m in annual revenues for the year, came from Google.
Firefox assigns the Google search site as the default for the browser's search bar; users can, however, change that to a rival search site if they wish. The browser also defaults to a Google URL for its home page.
Mozilla and Google last inked a two-year deal in 2006 that was to expire in November.

 

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